HomeAbout UsContact UsOur ServiceSite Map

Janda Baik White Water Tubing

Code WWT01

 

For Booking or Query, please contact us ;

Mobile | What's App | WeChat : 6019 662 2929 | 019 229 5757

Email : klfong.bigtreemalaysia@gmail.com

 

 

Information

 

Geographically located in the state of Pahang, Malaysia (03 31N Longitude 101 55 E) ranging from 1500 to 4500 feet above sea level. The climate here serves in between 23" and 28" Celsius during the day and below 22" Celsius in the evenings. A simple Malay kampong or village with a population of approximately 1000 people. Janda Baik is set amidst a small valley bounded by thick rainforest laced together with picturesque streams and cool rushing brooks of waterfalls with. Located approximately 45 km and about an hour's drive from Kuala Lumpur, the place is popular holiday and recreational destination for city folks, not to mentioned foreign visitors especially global backpackers.

"Janda Baik" means "the good widow" in Malay. As the story is told by local folks, in the old days a path that connects Selangor and Pahang beats its way through the village. It was said that a mercenary, who was returning after fighting in a civil war in Selangor stopped at the village for a rest and to nurse some wounds he had sustained in battle. Upon seeing this ragtag team in the vicinity, a kindly widow immediately offered help and tended to the mercenary's wounds. The man was thankful and deeply cherished the kindness. As a mark of respect for this kind widow, the leader of the warrior pack would always advise his men to call on the woman whenever they were in the vicinity.

 

Package Rate

 

Minimum 5 Person

RM 85

10 Person or Above

RM 64

Included GST 6%

Prices shown are subject to change without prior notice

 

Package Includes

 

  • English speaking guide

  • River guide

  • Equipments

  • Refreshments

 

What to Bring

 

  • Change of clothes (for changing after rafting - please take note, after rafting, all guest are require to clean up (shower & change clothing) before boarding)

  • Sarong

  • Personal medication and cravings

  • River sandals or sport shoes with laces

  • A pair of socks is recommended if using sport shoes

  • Straps for spectacles or goggles for contact lenses

  • Towel

  • Shoes

  • Slippers

  • Sun block

  • Insect repellent

  • Personal toiletries

  • Waterproof camera (optional)

  • And don't forget to bring a sense of adventure / fun / humor / enthusiasm and a flexible attitude

 

What to Wear

 

  • wear comfortable

  • sandals

  • t-shirt

  • long or short pants.

 

Enquiry Form !!

Booking Name

:

Mobile No

:

Email Address

:

Nationality

:

Tour Code

:

Service

:

Service Date

:

//

Number of People

:

(Minimum 5 Person for Adult)

Pick up Location

:

Remark

:

  

 

Related Products

 

 

Special Notes

 

DIFFICULTY  Leisurely to Easy (suitable for children age 6 and above)

River rafting is subject to the water level and weather condition. If rafting is not possible to be conducted, an alternative date may be suggested.

Take Note (fine print), Due to the nature of the tour, the weather, road condition, local circumstances, prevailing safety factors, the route & itinerary may vary to those published but the content of the tour will remain the same. The final decision of the actual itinerary will be made by us on the day of the tour.

Do's and Don'ts

  • Do not litter

  • Bring all rubbish out of  the raft

  • Do not damage any plants or trees

  • Do not make excessive noise

  • Stay healthy

  • Do not take unnecessary risks cike Climbing up rocks

  • Always listen to advise given by your  guides

  • Do not stay away from the group, you can easily get lost

 

Safety Briefing

 

A detailed safety briefing will be conducted before each trip. The rafting team for the trip explains what to do if the raft flips, how to help each other out of the water and what conditions to expect.

 

We always give the worst-case scenario so that people know what to expect from the trip and, therefore, have the choice to forego their trip after the safety talk. Once in the raft, you are instructed by your rafting guide as to how to negotiate the rapids and some practice is done before you set off. You are also briefed before each rapid on how the raft is expected to react.

 

Practical Rafting Tips

 

All rafters will be given a safety briefing before the ride and will be shown basic backward and forward paddling techniques.

 

Always check that the helmets and life jackets provided fit you well and are not too tight or too loose.


Your life jacket will buoy you in the eventuality of the raft overturning. If you've over-turned close to the river bank, don't use your raft paddle, as you may hit someone else.

 

Do not attempt to use the paddle as a lever against rocks as you risk getting hit by it.
The following are some points to remember:


Bring a change of clothes. A warm-up jacket is also a good idea.
Wear well-fitting shoes, rubber shoes or sandals.


Jewellery which cannot be secured firmly should not be worn while rafting.


Those wearing glasses are reminded to use an elastic sports band to anchor their spectacles.


Contact lens users are advised to wear spectacles instead, in order to cut down the risk of their lenses getting contaminated by river water.

 

More Information on Rafting

 

Prevention & Preparation - Rafting Safety
Article from The Star on Saturday, 17 July, Weekender Section
By: Chan Yuen-Li & Zoe Higginbotham

Last week, we explained how to recognise potential hazards in a river environment. With this knowledge, river users can make good decisions on how to prevent accidents. If you are visiting a river to picnic or swim, you can easily avoid any dangerous river features and still enjoy yourself by visiting a safer spot.
However, if you choose to take part in an activity that uses a more hazardous part of the river such as whitewater rafting or kayaking in rapids, then you are likely to need some self rescue skills. These skills are, of course, relevant to all river users as river and weather conditions can change rapidly and the unexpected can always happen.
If you are planning to swim, tube, raft or kayak down a rapid then equipping yourself with proper personal safety equipment is essential. Even if you are in a very stable river craft, you must assume that you could end up falling into the water.
The two mandatory pieces of equipment are a life-jacket (personal floatation device or PFD) and helmet. A PFD does not only help to keep you afloat, it also acts as body amour protecting you from any rocks you might meet while swimming. It also provides insulation against the cold – an important consideration in colder climates.
Anyone who intends to be in a whitewater environment needs to have a PFD, regardless of whether they can swim or not. As discussed last week, river currents are powerful forces that can overwhelm even the strongest swimmers.
When choosing a PFD, two important factors are floatation and fit. Old PFDs which have deteriorated over time tend to have less floatation. Inspect such gear carefully. When fitting a PFD, ensure that it can be fastened tightly. Make sure that it is the right size for you and that the buckles or zips are secure.
A rescuer can also use your PFD as a means to grab hold of you. So it is in your interest to make sure that the PFD is snug or it might be rescued without you inside it! When swimming, your PFD should not float up in front of your face.
A helmet is a vital piece of equipment, protecting your head from rocks, boats or even the flailing paddles of your friends. A helmet should fit snugly, covering the forehead and protecting your temples. It should not slide around on your head and should fasten securely under the chin. A head injury could easily knock you unconscious, immediately creating a life-threatening situation. If you have a brain, then you will want to wear a helmet.
When you swim down a rapid – either inadvertently or for fun – a helmet and PFD will certainly help to protect you. Another line of defence is to learn and practise some self-rescue techniques.
To find yourself thrown into turbulent water is quite a disorientating experience for most people. The first thing is to relax. The more you thrash about, the more energy and breath you will waste.
It is extremely important that you do not try to stand up while in turbulent water. The water is turbulent because there are rocks beneath the surface. You should keep your feet off the riverbed to avoid getting a foot trapped in between or under rocks. This is a severe hazard as the current can push a person with a trapped foot face-down in the water and hold him there.
The best way to survive a swim in whitewater is to float on your back with your feet downstream in front of you. Your head, butt and feet should be held high so that you can see your toes. This position allows you to see where you are going and look out for hazards and safe zones. With your feet in front, you can fend off rocks using the legs as a shock absorber. Men may prefer to keep their legs together!
While you are in this position, try to look for calm pools and eddies which may offer a safe exit from the rapid. Your primary goals should be to protect yourself, to get enough air and to aggressively swim to safety when an opportunity arises. As you see a likely exit spot, turn onto your stomach and swim for it with determination.
If you get caught in a strong backwash current of a waterfall, you may find yourself being tumbled about like an old rag in a washing machine. Try to relax, take breaths when you can and swim sideways out of the circulating current. If you can’t escape sideways remember that waterfalls contain a powerful downcurrent that you can follow and use to push you under the backwash and out. In such a situation, be prepared to make many attempts at self rescue. Whatever you do, don’t give up!
Regular river users should consider attending courses or reading books which cover some of the following skills: rescuing other people, use of rescue equipment, first aid and CPR. Rescuing other people is a skill that requires training, practice and good judgment. It is potentially very dangerous as would-be rescuers can easily become victims.
Remember that accident prevention should be the primary aim of all river users. The best form of rescue is the one that never has to happen.  

  •  Advertising
  •  | Website Terms Of Use
  •  |
  •  Privacy Policy

Copyright, Malaysia Adventure Tours, 2012 Photography provided by Malaysia Adventure Tours